Kattegat

kattegat

Where is the Kattegatt?

The Kattegat (Danish: ; Swedish: Kattegatt) is a 30,000 km 2 (12,000 sq mi) sea area bounded by the Jutlandic peninsula in the west, the Danish Straits islands of Denmark and the Baltic Sea to the south and the provinces of Västergötland, Skåne, Halland and Bohuslän in Sweden in the east.

What is the Kattegat strait in Denmark?

Kattegat. The strait trends north-south between the Jutland (Jylland) peninsula and Sjælland (Zealand) island of Denmark (west and south) and Sweden (east); it connects through the Skagerrak (north) with the North Sea and through The Sound and the Great Belt and Little Belt (south) with the Baltic Sea.

What body of water drains into the Kattegat?

The Baltic Sea drains into the Kattegat through the Danish Straits. The sea area is a continuation of the Skagerrak and may be seen as a bay of the Baltic Sea or the North Sea or, as in traditional Scandinavian usage, neither of these.

Why is the Kattegat so important?

Control of the Kattegat, and access to it, have been important throughout the history of international seafaring. Until the completion of the Eider Canal in 1784, the Kattegat was the only sea route into and out of the Baltic region.

Where is the real Kattegat?

In the series, the legendary Viking settlement is located somewhere in the sound of a fjord in Scandinavia. The real Kattegat is a large sea area between Denmark and southern Norway and Sweden, linking the North Sea and the Baltic Sea.

What is the meaning of Kattegatt?

The Kattegat (Danish: ˈkʰad̥əɡ̊ad̥) or Kattegatt (Swedish: ˈkatːəˈɡatː) is a 30,000 km2 sea area bounded by the Jutlandic peninsula in the west, the Danish Straits islands of Denmark to the south, and the provinces of Västergötland, Scania, Halland, and Bohuslän in Sweden in the east.

Is the Kattegat part of the Baltic Sea?

The Baltic Seadrains into the Kattegat through the Danish Straits. The sea area is a continuation of the Skagerrakand may be seen as a bay of the North Sea, a bayof the Baltic Seaor—as in traditional Scandinavian usage—neither of these. Imagei- Kattegat and Skagerrak

Why is the Kattegat important to Denmark?

A surface flow of fresh water from the Baltic Sea lowers the strait’s salinity to 30 parts per 1,000. The Danish islands of Læsø, Anholt, and Samsø are within the strait. The chief ports are Gothenburg and Halmstad in Sweden and Århus in Denmark. The Kattegat is an important commercial navigation passage and a popular summer vacation area.

Why is the tributary of the Kattegat not listed as a river?

Göta älv, a tributary of the Kattegat, is not listed, as due to the northward upper low-salinity-flow in the sea, its water hardly reaches the Baltic proper: Skerries form an integral and typical part of many of the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea, such as these in the archipelago of the Åland Islands, Finland.

Why are the Kattegats sills so shallow?

The shallow sills are obstacles to the flow of heavy salt water from the Kattegat into the basins around Bornholm and Gotland . The Kattegat and the southwestern Baltic Sea are well oxygenated and have a rich biology. The remainder of the Sea is brackish, poor in oxygen and in species.

Where is the Kattegatt?

The Kattegat (Danish: ; Swedish: Kattegatt) is a 30,000 km 2 (12,000 sq mi) sea area bounded by the Jutlandic peninsula in the west, the Danish Straits islands of Denmark and the Baltic Sea to the south and the provinces of Västergötland, Skåne, Halland and Bohuslän in Sweden in the east.

Why is the Kattegat so important?

Control of the Kattegat, and access to it, have been important throughout the history of international seafaring. Until the completion of the Eider Canal in 1784, the Kattegat was the only sea route into and out of the Baltic region.

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