Caves calem

caves calem

What is Cálem?

Cálem is wine. Its Douro. Its Porto. In 1859, António A. Cálem set his goals: crossing the Atlantic and exporting to Brazil. With this connection to Brazil, story of adventure begins: wines are exported using Cálems own fleet in exchange for exotic woods.

Why choose a Cálem tour?

Cálem has been producing top quality Ports since 1859. Today, after 150 years of history of success we give you the perfect chance to experience our unique guided tours. We start in the museum where you will learn more about the Douro Demarcated Wine Region, the producing of Port and the history of our company.

Why is Cálem called Caravel?

With this connection to Brazil, story of adventure begins: wines are exported using Cálems own fleet in exchange for exotic woods. Hence the symbol used for the house logotype, the caravel.

Why is Cálem called Caravel?

With this connection to Brazil, story of adventure begins: wines are exported using Cálems own fleet in exchange for exotic woods. Hence the symbol used for the house logotype, the caravel.

Who is António Cálem?

In 1859, António A. Cálem set his goals: crossing the Atlantic and exporting to Brazil. With this connection to Brazil, story of adventure begins: wines are exported using Cálems own fleet in exchange for exotic woods.

What is a caravel in history?

The caravel (Portuguese: caravela, IPA:) is a small highly-maneuverable sailing ship developed in the 15th century by the Portuguese to explore along the West African coast and into the Atlantic Ocean. The lateen sails gave it speed and the capacity for sailing windward (beating).

What was the purpose of the lateen sails on a caravel?

The lateen sails gave it speed and the capacity for sailing windward ( beating ). Caravels were used by the Portuguese and Castilians for the oceanic exploration voyages during the 15th and the 16th centuries, during the Age of Discovery .

Why did Columbus use a caravel on his voyage?

For Columbus’s expedition in 1492, caravels were probably chosen as at least two of the accompanying vessels for the voyage. Santa María, however, is generally agreed to have been a nau. The Portuguese retained the lateen sails for their caravels, because they better suited their purposes on the African Coast. But by this time in

What is the difference between a caravel and a carrack?

Towards the end of the 15th century, the Portuguese developed a larger version of the caravel, bearing a forecastle and sterncastle – though not as high as those of a carrack, which would have made it unweatherly – but most distinguishable for its square-rigged foremast, and three other masts bearing lateen rig.

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